Research

Changing Perceptions about Beef

The March 2015 edition of the Consumer Beef Index documented several highly positive changes in consumer perceptions, attitudes and beef use, injecting additional optimism about beef demand. First, the percentage of consumers who say that the positives of beef outweigh the negatives reached a four-year high of 77 percent! The percentage of consumers who stated that they serve beef three or more times per week was 35 percent, a return to highs recorded in 2012. Beef use by millennial parents exceeded general-population numbers, with 38 percent of them noting consumption of three or more beef meals weekly. A strong interest in knowing more about beef preparation also was clear, with a strong majority of millennial parents interested in getting more information about: how to make a great burger; cook beef in a way to provide servings at two or more meals; cook a steak; and cook a roast – all things being address through checkoff resources.

Sharing Protein Summit Proceedings

Pre-press Protein Summit 2.0 meeting proceedings now are available via five manuscripts that will be published in the June edition of The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. The Summit drew nutrition researchers and thought leaders together to discuss the latest evidence on protein and its role in public health. The full articles can be found at these links: Effective translation of current dietary guidance: understanding and communicating the concepts of minimal and optimal levels of dietary protein; The role of protein in weight loss and maintenance; Defining meal requirements for protein to optimize metabolic roles of amino acids; Commonly consumed protein foods contribute to nutrient intake, diet quality, and nutrient adequacy; and Protein and healthy aging.


For additional information, check out these sites:

Consumers looking for nutrition and dietary information about beef can go to www.beefnutrition.org to order or download materials and research information, or find a schedule of nutrition events and seminars.
 
Consumers, producers and other industry professionals can go to www.beefresearch.org for summaries of checkoff-funded research in the areas of beef safety, human nutrition, product enhancement and market research, projects which provide the foundation for checkoff programs in promotion, marketing, education, information and foreign marketing.
 
Safety is a priority of the beef industry and www.bifsco.org,  houses information about the Beef Industry Food Safety Council (BIFSCo), its discussions and meetings, an application to join the council, and consumer information about beef safety.
 
Finding new convenient cuts is one very successful way the checkoff has helped add value to the beef carcass over the years. In cooperation with the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, http://bovine.unl.edu/ is the industry’s primary beef cut resource.
 
Checkoff-funded Beef Quality Assurance program information is available at www.bqa.org where you can find systematic information about coupling proper animal-husbandry techniques with accepted scientific knowledge to improve the quality of the end beef products.
 
Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) is a misunderstood but potentially serious animal disease. For the most accurate information, turn to www.bseinfo.org, an informational site housing current information regarding for consumers, producers and beef industry representatives.
 
While never occurring in the United States, www.fmdinfo.org is an informational site housing current information regarding foot-and-mouth disease for consumers, producers and beef industry representatives.

 


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