Research

Exploring Cooking-Steak Fails

Beef Checkoff conducted market research study on why consumers fail at cooking beef steaksPositive beef-eating experiences are critical to overall satisfaction with beef, but if you have experienced a not-so-perfect steak cooking at home, you’re not alone because so have some beef-loving millennial consumers. That’s why the checkoff conducted an exploratory qualitative market research study to understand better why consumers fail at cooking beef steaks. Phase one of two phases comprised observation of consumers at the grocery store, followed by in-home cooking observations of consumers cooking their steaks of choice. Phase two hosted mini focus groups that included steak-cooking demonstrations by the checkoff’s culinary team. Because one of the main challenges turns out to be determining their preferred doneness level, the checkoff shared tips with consumers about how to cook a steak – both on the stovetop and on the grill – to their desired level of doneness. Overall, consumers gained confidence in cooking steak at home, and the checkoff identified priorities for areas for communication to all consumers.

Learn more about this market research study.

Harvest Market Showcases Beef

The checkoff recently published another fact sheet in a series responding to "Tough Questions about Beef Sustainability." The series intent is to provide high-level answers to some of the more challenging and complex issues related to beef sustainability. The fact sheet, “How does food waste impact sustainability?” examines food waste from production to consumption, its impact on the environment, and opportunities for improvement.

Additional Beef Checkoff Resources:

Consumers looking for nutrition and dietary information about beef can go to www.beefnutrition.org to order or download materials and research information, or find a schedule of nutrition events and seminars.
 
Consumers, producers and other industry professionals can go to www.beefresearch.org for summaries of checkoff-funded research in the areas of beef safety, human nutrition, product enhancement and market research, projects which provide the foundation for checkoff programs in promotion, marketing, education, information and foreign marketing.
 
Safety is a priority of the beef industry and www.bifsco.org,  houses information about the Beef Industry Food Safety Council (BIFSCo), its discussions and meetings, an application to join the council, and consumer information about beef safety.
 
Finding new convenient cuts is one very successful way the checkoff has helped add value to the beef carcass over the years. In cooperation with the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, http://bovine.unl.edu/ is the industry’s primary beef cut resource.
 
Checkoff-funded Beef Quality Assurance program information is available at www.bqa.org where you can find systematic information about coupling proper animal-husbandry techniques with accepted scientific knowledge to improve the quality of the end beef products.
 
Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) is a misunderstood but potentially serious animal disease. For the most accurate information, turn to www.bseinfo.org, an informational site housing current information regarding for consumers, producers and beef industry representatives.
 
While never occurring in the United States, www.fmdinfo.org is an informational site housing current information regarding foot-and-mouth disease for consumers, producers and beef industry representatives.

 


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